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Man eating meat burger Eating or preparing undercooked meat can raise the risk of infection - Media Credit: Adobe Stock

NHS Issues Advice To Meat-Eaters Amid Outbreak Of Monkeypox

Monkeypox can be transmitted by contact with an infected person or non-human animal, including meat-eating

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3 Minutes Read

The UK’s National Health Service (NHS) has cautioned those who eat meat to choose and prepare their food carefully, as monkeypox cases climb in England.

Monkeypox is a rare infection that typically manifests as a rash, which develops into fluid-filled blisters. The rash is often preceded by symptoms such as a high temperature, headaches, muscle aches, backaches, swollen glands, shivering, and/or exhaustion.

It usually takes between five and 21 days for the first symptom to appear after infection.

Monkeypox in the UK

Monkeypox is typically found in Africa, but more than 130 cases have now been discovered in 19 countries outside of the continent, cropping up in Europe, the US, Canada, and Australia.

There are now 71 confirmed cases of monkeypox in the UK – 70 in England and one in Scotland, according to the UK Health Security Agency (UKHSA).

Last week, on May 16, there were just seven confirmed cases in the UK.

According to news outlet i, the recent outbreak is the first time person-to-person transmission of monkeypox has occurred in the UK.

But officials have assured that while the number of cases is “unusual,” the illness is usually mild, clearing up in two to four weeks.

The government has ordered more than 20,000 vaccine doses as a precaution, i reports.

How do you catch monkeypox?

Monkeypox is predominantly spread by wild animals – namely rats, mice, and squirrels – in west and central Africa. A human can catch the disease if they are bitten by an infected animal, or if they come into contact with infected blood, body fluids, blisters, or scabs.

You can also catch monkeypox by eating undercooked meat from an infected animal, according to the NHS, or by handling infected “products” like animal skin and fur.

Touching clothing, bedding, or towels used by anyone with the monkeypox rash also raises the risk of infection. The coughs and sneezes of an infected individual can spread the disease too.

Hands with monkeypox rash
Getty Images / Handout Monkeypox begins as a rush and develops into blisters

How to avoid getting monkeypox

To lower the risk of contracting monkeypox, the NHS advises people to “only eat meat that has been cooked thoroughly.” Individuals should also not eat or touch bushmeat (the flesh of wild animals).

Washing your hands regularly with soap and water, or using an alcohol-based hand sanitizer, can also protect against the infection.

The NHS has urged people to stay away from wild or stray animals, animals that look unwell, and dead animals.

Additionally, the organization stresses the importance of maintaining distance from people who are unwell and may have monkeypox, including not sharing bedding or towels.

Those who have monkeypox are advised to self-isolate, and stay away from pets.

Dr. Susan Hopkins, chief medical adviser for the UKHSA, said: “If anyone suspects they might have rashes or lesions on any part of their body, particularly if they have recently had a new sexual partner, they should limit their contact with others and contact NHS 111 or their local sexual health service as soon as possible, though please phone ahead before attending in person.”

Visit the NHS website for more information.

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The Author

Jemima Webber

Jemima is the Head of Editorial of Plant Based News. Aside from writing about climate and animal rights issues, she studies psychology in Newcastle, Australia (where she was born).

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asiojdfoij
asiojdfoij
1 month ago

Warning on eating meat, on a plant-based news page. Huh, the propaganda is strong

Marc Pieterse
Marc Pieterse
1 month ago

Where are the Twitter Fbook etc. Buttons?

Plant Based News Admin
Editor
Plant Based News Admin
9 days ago
Reply to  Marc Pieterse

Thanks for your comment. You can find them in the top right corner of the website when you enter the menu.

john burniston
john burniston
1 month ago

Alarmist floating fear again load of monkey business as usual

john burniston
john burniston
30 days ago

My opinion is blocked-no free speach

andy
andy
30 days ago

please post a link to the NHS warning thank you

Plant Based News Admin
Editor
Plant Based News Admin
9 days ago
Reply to  andy

Thanks for your comment Andy. https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/monkeypox/

Helen Murray
Helen Murray
30 days ago

The animals bite back!

Paul Crowhurst
Paul Crowhurst
30 days ago

Thank you. Jemima.x

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