UK Urged To End Factory Farming After 'Shocking' (And Completely Legal) Conditions Exposed
Pigs covered in dirt in a factory farm Around 85 percent of UK land animals are factory farmed - Media Credit: World Animal Protection

UK Urged To End Factory Farming After ‘Appalling’ (And Completely Legal) Conditions Exposed

A new investigation by World Animal Protection has “exposed the myth” of the UK’s “world-leading” animal welfare standards

By

3 Minutes Read

The UK government is being urged to put an end to factory farming after an investigation uncovered “appalling” – and completely legal – abuse in these facilities. 

World Animal Protection found piglets with cut tails, mother pigs in metal cages, and chickens struggling to breathe during visits to four farms.

Investigators visited two pig factory farms in the UK. These housed both “farrowing” pigs (mother pigs used to produce piglets) and “finishing” pigs (those raised for slaughter and breeding). 

They collected footage, which according to World Animal Protection, exposes the myth of the UK’s “world-leading” animal welfare standards (something the government insisted the country had last year). 

They found that finishing pigs were crammed into pens covered in dried excrement and that they were standing on liquid slurry. So-called “enrichment,” which was supposedly intended to meet behavioral needs, consisted of a small block of wood attached to a metal chain or a piece of plastic and rope in others. Several pigs were also documented with hernias or growths.

Farrowing pigs were confined to tiny metal cages, which weren’t big enough for them to turn around in. Investigators observed dead piglets, discarded piglet tails, and afterbirths strewn across the floor.

They also visited two chicken farms and found birds living in cramped conditions, as well as struggling to breathe, stand, or walk. Many of the birds also had bald patches and filthy feathers.   

World Animal Protection Pigs are routinely kept in farrowing crates for around five weeks at a time in the UK

The UK factory farming industry

It is thought that around 85 percent of UK land animals are factory farmed. These animals are often mutilated, confined to cages, and not given the chance to exhibit natural behaviors. 

Despite the fact that this industry is associated with poor animal welfare and is environmentally destructive (animal agriculture is responsible for at least 14.5 percent of greenhouse gas emissions), factory farming is growing in the UK. 

It was reported this summer that there has been an influx of US-style so-called “mega-farms” in the country. These farms can hold hundreds of thousands – and in some cases over a million – animals at a time. It’s thought that there are now more than 1,000 of these in Britain. 

The campaign to end factory farming

World Animal Protection is urging the government to ban new or expanding factory farms with its “No Future for Factory Farming” campaign. 

“The narrative put forward is that the UK has some of the highest welfare standards in the world, but the reality of what these standards look like on factory farms is hidden behind closed doors,” Lindsay Duncan, the campaign lead, told Plant Based News (PBN).

 “Labeling and imagery are designed to mislead and give the impression of bucolic farms where animals get to roam outdoors. The majority of animals farmed in the UK never get to see the outside world and sky.”

You can find out more about the ongoing campaign here.

Millions around the world trust Plant Based News for content about navigating our changing planet & our role in it.

Our independent team of journalists and experts are committed to making an impact through a wide range of content—and you can help by supporting our work today.

heading/author

The Author

Polly Foreman

Polly is the Deputy Editor of Plant Based News. She has been vegan since 2014, and has written extensively on veganism, animal rights, and the environment.

More by Polly Foreman iconography/arrow-right

heading/comments

Leave a Comment

Plant Based News Comment Policy

In short:- If you act with maturity and consideration for other users, you should have no problems. Please read our Comment policy before commenting.

Comments [0]  
buttons/scroll-to-top/scroll-to-top-small-active
0
Would love your thoughts, please comment.x
()
x