Fast Food Chain Offers ‘World’s First’ £1.99 Vegan Burger To Make Plant-Based Eating More Accessible Ready Burger says its vegan food is affordable and sustainable. - Media Credit: Ready Burger

Fast Food Chain Offers ‘World’s First’ £1.99 Vegan Burger To Make Plant-Based Eating More Accessible

Ready Burger is working to craft the 'world's most' affordable and accessible vegan menu

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2 Minutes Read

A completely vegan fast food chain called Ready Burger is helping to usher in a new era – one where plant-based food is affordable and accessible, but doesn’t compromise on flavor.

It’s what motivated the company to launch what it says is the ‘most affordable vegan burger on the planet’.

The fast food joint’s meat-free burger costs just £1.99. The patty – made from oyster mushrooms, oat fiber, and soy protein – is served with ketchup, mustard, pickles, and onion on a vegan bun. It’s a source of vitamin B12, protein, and fiber. 

“We all know we need to eat less meat but plant-based eating is still too expensive. That’s the biggest barrier to adoption,” Ready Burger Co-founder and CEO Max Miller said in a statement. 

“So, we developed and launched a menu and business in less than a year  to deliver affordable and tasty vegan fast food classics. Our £1.99 signature Ready Burger was a major goal for us to realise and we have plans to reduce prices further with more world firsts as we achieve economies of scale.”

Vegan McDonald’s 

Ready Burger debuted the plant-based option in May, when it opened its flagship store in London’s Crouch End. Since then, the chain has opened up a second location, on Finchley Road. 

“Following the launch of our first Ready Burger store in May 2021, we set out to create the world’s most affordable and most accessible plant-based menu,” Miller told Plant Based News

“We believe we are the first in the world to produce a £1.99 vegan burger, not to mention a £3.59 Big Ready – indexed against the infamous Big Mac,” he added. The Big Ready comes with two patties, Ready sauce, dairy-free cheese, pickles, lettuce, and diced onion, sandwiched between a seeded double-cut bun.

The chain’s menu also features the Chicken Challenger, the Texas Stacker, and the Bacon Double Cheeseburger, as well as crispy chicken fillets and fries. 

The eatery has proven popular so far. Since its inception less than six months ago, Ready Burger has already sold more than 120,000 vegan menu items.

Each customer is helping to ‘support change’, says the company in a press release, adding that its plant-based food is far more sustainable than meat-based options. In fact, Ready Burger’s vegan beef requires 70 percent less water and 93 percent less land to produce than animal-derived beef. It also generates 92 percent fewer greenhouse gas emissions

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The Author

Jemima Webber

Jemima is the Head of Editorial of Plant Based News. Aside from writing about climate and animal rights issues, she studies psychology in Newcastle, Australia (where she was born).

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gary fair
gary fair
8 months ago

vegan burgers, no clogged arteries.

MoMartin
MoMartin
8 months ago

Cool… England’s so ahead of the curve on plant-based… feels like the US over here will take a few more generations to catch up

T. Clarke
T. Clarke
8 months ago

Please stop naming your new foods after animals, pigs, chicken, beef etc.. Why should people who renounce meat eating need their food still named after animals? It’s like harming people being instead substituted with a simulation of harming people, not a real step forward but reinforcing current meat eating practice.

Plant Based News Moderator
Plant Based News Moderator
7 months ago
Reply to  T. Clarke

Thanks for your comment.

These products are often named after their animal counterpart to help meat eaters transition to more plant-based foods..

Callum Green
Callum Green
7 months ago
Reply to  T. Clarke

Perhaps you live under a rock, but the simulation of harming people (I.e. video games) is actually incredibly popular…

T. Clarke
T. Clarke
7 months ago
Reply to  Callum Green

Yes and I think that too is harmful

Callum Green
Callum Green
7 months ago
Reply to  T. Clarke

And what makes you think that? Because it doesn’t seem to be based on reality at all…

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