Reading Time: < 1 minute It comes after the UK government announced the world's most 'ambitious' carbon emissions targets Credit: Meatless Farm
Reading Time: < 1 minute

Vegan meat giant The Meatless Farm Company is urging the UK government to up its chances of meeting carbon emission targets.

The company welcomed the government’s targets to slash emissions by 78 percent by 2035 – announced earlier this week – but argues they don’t go far enough.

Gas emissions targets

Meatless Farm calls the government to improve access, availability, and understanding of meat reduction.

This is in order to meet the targets – which Prime Minister Boris Johnson declared ‘the most ambitious in the world’.

They include helping ‘polluting’ industries to decarbonize. The
Department for Business, Energy & Industrial Strategy says it will create more ‘green jobs’.

However, its position on diets remains.

In a statement, the government body said it would keep ‘maintaining people’s freedom of choice, including on their diet’.

‘Meat free’

But Morten Toft Bech, Meatless Farm’s founder, warned the targets could be overwhelming for consumers.

Toft Bech told PBN: “One of the single biggest ways we can all start to make a difference is through reducing meat consumption.

“This doesn’t have to be as drastic as cutting it out completely. If we all went ‘meat free’ for one more meal per week it could reduce UK carbon emissions by up to 8.4 percent.”

Reducing meat will help ‘accelerate’ the nation in meeting the targets, he claimed.

Moreover, leading this change lays on the shoulders of the government, manufacturers, supermarkets, and restaurants – he added.

Meatless Farm

The call comes after the Business Secretary Kwasi Kwarteng credited people going vegan in leading the charge towards meeting the targets.

Moreover, he agreed the government should ‘accelerate the change’.

Meatless Farm has long encouraged more people to go meat-free across the globe.

For example, it’s expanded products into Canada. In addition, it hinted it could move into the cell-based meat market.

Emily is a News and Features Writer for Plant Based News. She has previously worked as a journalist in Devon, UK, reporting on local issues from politics to the environment.