Reading Time: < 1 minute Ecotone is pushing for food companies to make biodiversity loss more understandable to the public Credit: Adobe. Do not use without permission
Reading Time: < 1 minute

Organic food company, Ecotone – which owns Clipper Teas and Whole Earth Foods – is calling on the food industry to better educate Brits on the importance of protecting biodiversity amidst the climate crisis.

According to an online survey, just five percent of the British public list food production and intensive farming as the biggest cause of environmental concerns, the company found.

This is despite recent reports blaming animal agriculture for being responsible for a staggering 87 percent of greenhouse gas emissions.

Biodiversity and climate change

Whilst the survey found most people had an understanding of climate change, global warming, and deforestation – many were unaware of biodiversity.

This term refers to the variety of life on earth, defining every living thing from plants to animals.

Moreover, deforestation and global warming contribute to a loss of biodiversity.

Despite this, ten times more people listed climate change and global warming as their biggest environmental concern.

Additionally, the most damaging human activities for the planet were most listed as plastic pollution and deforestation.

Food system

‘The food industry has a duty to make biodiversity loss tangible and easy for people to digest’, Ecotone urges.

Emma Vass is the company’s CEO.

In a statement sent to PBN, she said: “We need to help them associate the food they buy with the impact on the planet. From the land to grow the ingredients, water used in production through to the end packaging.

“Biodiversity is perceived as important, but it is not fully understood.

“To build a better future for all life on this planet, we need to start building awareness. And, tackle the biggest environmental threat of them all; the current food system.”

You can find out more about Ecotone here

Emily is a News and Features Writer for Plant Based News. She has previously worked as a journalist in Devon, UK, reporting on local issues from politics to the environment.