Reading Time: < 1 minute 'Despite the pressures brought about by the pandemic, we remained steadfast in providing foods with purpose that nourish people and the planet' Credit: Adobe. Do not use without permission.
Reading Time: < 1 minute

Food production giant, Del Monte Foods has unveiled plans to produce two new plant-based plastic packaging alternatives.

This is part of an eco-drive highlighted in its latest sustainability report, with a view to slashing emissions and tackling food insecurity.

Del Monte Foods

The company, known for its tinned fruit and vegetable products, is one of the largest producers and distributors of its kind in the US. This fiscal year alone, it boasted net sales of almost $1.5 billion.

And now, it aims to ‘cultivate a healthy planet’ by ensuring sustainable agriculture practices and reducing emissions.

Del Monte is also developing new health-focused products and says it plans to educate the next generation about healthy eating.

Trials have begun, the report states, on two new plant-based plastic options. This is with a view to converting packaging to 100 percent recyclable, reusable, or compostable by 2030.

And on emissions, Del Monte claims to have already increased truckload efficiency by 14 percent miles per gallon.

Sustainable goals

CEO Greg Longstreet said: “Despite the pressures brought about by the pandemic, we remained steadfast in providing foods with purpose that nourish people and the planet. 

“This means being as thoughtful about our environmental sustainability efforts as we are about delivering nutritious, primarily plant-based foods that can be enjoyed by people from all walks of life. 

“We remain committed to achieving our 2025 goals and have implemented new transparency and efficiency efforts, improved the already-high nutrient content of our products, embedded new sustainable agriculture methods, conducted a new materiality assessment, and more.”

You can read the report in full here

Emily is a News and Features Writer for Plant Based News. She has previously worked as a journalist in Devon, UK, reporting on local issues from politics to the environment.