Reading Time: < 1 minute 140 workers will have to seek alternative employment
Reading Time: < 1 minute

The global meat processing company, Danish Crown, has
been forced to end nightshifts at one location due to insufficient need for ‘slaughterers’.

The slaughterhouse in Ringsted, on the Danish island
of Zealand, will no longer have a night shift as of June 1.

This will leave 140 of the company’s employees without
reliable work – although half will have the option to cover vacations until
September.

Hoping for slaughter

Company
CEO Søren F. Eriksen explained that more shareholders stopped slaughtering with
Danish Crown than anticipated, and that there’s been an increase in export of
pigs to Germany and Poland for slaughter.

Danish
Crown has grown in recent years, with a two percent increase in business since
the October 1, but the figure falls short of the anticipated five percent
increase, leaving the company overstaffed.

However,
Eriksen said: “We have justified hope that more pigs will be slaughtered, so we
may need skilled employees again.”

Support package

Despite Danish Crown’s treatment of nonhuman animals,
it appears that the company wants to provide support for its soon-to-be-dismissed
employees.

Pork Production Director, Per Laursen said: “We [will]
launch a social plan where each employee is invited to conversation to clarify
his and her opportunities, as well as creating a job bank for the employees. 

“Among other things, there will be opportunities for courses and education paid
for by Danish Crown.”

Emily Court

Emily Court is a writer and content creator published in Plant Based News, Raise Vegan, Living Vegan and The Financial Diet. A self-described "recovering vegan hothead," she is now a pragmatic member of Vancouver's vibrant and growing plant-powered community. Hailing from Halifax, Nova Scotia, she holds a BA in Spanish and certificate in Intercultural Communication from Dalhousie University, where her thesis focused on topics of cultural and gender-based discrimination. She aims to apply a privilege-conscious and culturally sensitive approach to her work in all fields.